Richmond 200 – Factoids # 91 – #95

To honour Richmond’s 200th anniversary, we will be posting factoids about our rich history. You should expect to see 200 pieces of information that you may or may not have already known.  The topic of these posts are: #91. Thomas Miller #92. George Seymour Lyon & tipcat #93. The burning of St. Philip’s #94. The New St. Philip’s #95. Population in 1861 Continue reading

Posted in churches, Events, industry, law and order, Personalities | Leave a comment

Richmond 200 – Factoids # 81- # 85

To honour Richmond’s 200th anniversary, we will be posting factoids about our rich history. Over the next year you should expect to see 200 pieces of information that you may or may not have already known.  The topic of these posts are: #81. grammar schools  #82. Richmond Grammar School #83. A young Edward Rielley #84. macadamized Richmond Road #85. Toll-Gates Continue reading

Posted in churches, education, Events, government, industry | 2 Comments

Richmond 200 – Factoids # 76- #80

To honour Richmond’s 200th anniversary, we will be posting factoids about our rich history. Over the next year you should expect to see 200 pieces of information that you may or may not have already known.  The topic of these posts are: #76. Patrick McElroy #77. Lyon Box Tomb #78. Joseph Hinton- the moderate #79. Joseph Hinton- the politician #80. Hintonburg Continue reading

Posted in churches, Personalities | Leave a comment

Richmond 200 – Factoids # 71- #75

To honour Richmond’s 200th anniversary, we will be posting factoids about our rich history. Over the next year you should expect to see 200 pieces of information that you may or may not have already known.  The topic of these posts are: #71. Richmond’s first municipal government #72. Occupations in 1851 #73. The women#74. Stone residences #75. The Common School Continue reading

Posted in government, Personalities | Leave a comment

Tabulation of 1834 Land Patents to Richmond and Goulbourn Claimants

Over the last few months researchers interested in early Richmond and Goulbourn history have been discussing location tickets, terms of settlement and land patents. The following tabulation, excerpted and transcribed by George Neville, adds to the discussion and explains why there was a spike in the number of land patents granted in 1834. From a Lower Canada government record George has compiled a list of prominent local residents who received FREE land patents as a reward for their patriotism and leadership. In 1834 there was no Richmond municipal government and it appears that the recorder did not differentiate between Goulbourn and Richmond. Many of the grants were 11 acres and it seems that these were comprised of one park lot and one town lot in Richmond. A cross reference with Jim Stanzell’s “Land Patent Holders Goulbourn Township and Village of Richmond”, and George Neville’s article “Town of Richmond and Park Lots in the Township of Goulbourn” (both published by OGS) will help verify the exact location of the grants. The link to the tabulation is provided below.

Revised Excerpts of Military Claimants for Richmond and Goulbourn Twp.-1

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in document, government, Personalities | Leave a comment

Richmond 200 – Factoids #66-#70

To honour Richmond’s 200th anniversary, we will be posting factoids about our rich history. Over the next year you should expect to see 200 pieces of information that you may or may not have already known.  The topic of these posts are: #66. The “waters” #67. the beginning of the end #68. Caledonia Springs #69. An Incorporated Village #70. The first Council Continue reading

Posted in Events, government, Locations, Personalities | Leave a comment

Richmond Roman Catholic priest purchases land from estate of Presbyterian minister

 

 

The Rev. Terrance Smith was the parish priest at St. Philip’s Roman Catholic Church for more than ten years (1836-1849). He arrived as the congregation faced the turmoil and upheaval resulting from the social strife of the late 1830s. Rev. Smith was the first resident priest and for at least part of the time lived with Col. George T. Burke. St. Philip’s Church burned in 1847. While the congregation turned to rebuilding the church, Rev. Smith sought to purchase the vacant lot beside the church site. That property, lot 15 on the west side of Maitland St. is, today, the location of the St. Philip’s Rectory. In the following article George Neville provides a biography of the original owner, the Rev. Andrew Glen and a transcription of the documents outlining the transfer of property rights from Rev. Glen’s son to Rev. Smith. Continue reading

Posted in churches, Personalities | Leave a comment